Open Data (English, noun)

From Data as a Second Language®
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Term or phrase Open Data
Language English
If an appropriate language is not listed, please suggest one
Function in sentence or vocabulary noun
If an appropriate function is not listed, please suggest one
Description of origin, manner, or change of usage The concept of Open Data is very new. It originated with the belief that the enormous amount of information routinely collected by government entities should be available to all citizens. In the late 2000s, governments and entities began to allow a greater number of users access to these resources. The first government policies on Open Data appeared in 2009. Today, more than 250 governments at national, subnational and city levels; almost 50 developed and developing countries; and entities such as the World Bank and United Nations have launched Open Data initiatives — and more are launched every year.
Is the text of the description a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Was the source of the description in print? If so, insert the source here.
Or was the source of the description online? If so, insert the source here. "Open Data in 60 Seconds," World Bank, accessed October 20, 2015, http://opendatatoolkit.worldbank.org/en/open-data-in-60-seconds.html
Relevant century CE or BCE
Relevant years CE or BCE
Relevant geographic areas
Relevant languages
Relevant terms and phrases open data, information, user, government, access, developed country, developing country, initiative, citizen
Relevant individuals
Relevant organizations World Bank, United Nations
Relevant books
Relevant websites and blogs
Relevant articles, blog entries, editorials, essays, graphics, interviews, and other content
Relevant periodicals, newsletters, journals, and similar publications
Relevant databases and repositories
Relevant applications
Relevant PDF documents
Relevant videos
Relevant audio and podcasts
Relevant projects and activities
Relevant events
Relevant constitutions, treaties, conventions, statutes, legislation, judicial decisions, regulations, proclamations, or other sources or enactments of law


Definition Open Data can best be described as accessible public data that people, companies, and organizations can use to launch new ventures, analyze patterns and trends, make data-driven decisions, and solve complex problems. It's very different from Big Data ... although the two overlap. Open Data is data with a mission: it's designed to provide free, open, transparent data that can transform the way we do business, run government, and manage all kinds of transactions. ... [T]he people behind Open Data are a diverse group, including leaders from the corporate world, technology, government, academia, nonprofits, and fields such as health, education, and environmental science.
Dialects or regional variations
Is the text of the definition a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Source of definition in print Gurin, Joel, Open Data Now: The Secret to Hot Startups, Smart Investing, Savvy Marketing, and Fast Innovation (New York: McGraw-Hill Education, 2014), 9 (italics and irrelevant text omitted)
Significant terms and phrases accessible, public, data, people, company, organization, venture, analyze, pattern, trend, data-driven, solve, Open Data, open data, Big Data, big data, overlap, mission, free, open, transparent, business, government, corporate, technology, academia, nonprofit
Definition I use "Open Data" to include data from any source that's made available in an "open" form that anyone can access and that meets a few specific conditions. All Open Data must be licensed in a way that allows for it's reuse. It should be in a form that can be easily read by computers, although here there are gradations of "openness." And there's general agreement that Open Data should be free of charge or cost just a minimal amount.
Dialects or regional variations
Is the text of the definition a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Source of definition in print Gurin, Joel, Open Data Now: The Secret to Hot Startups, Smart Investing, Savvy Marketing, and Fast Innovation (New York: McGraw-Hill Education, 2014), 10
Significant terms and phrases open data, data, license, reuse, open, openness
Definition Open data and content can be freely used, modified, and shared by anyone for any purpose[.]
Dialects or regional variations
Is the text of the definition a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Source of definition online "Open Definition," Open Knowledge Foundation, accessed August 11, 2015, http://opendefinition.org
Significant terms and phrases open data, data, open, content, free, use, modify, share, anyone, purpose
Definition The term “Open Data” has a very precise meaning. Data or content is open if anyone is free to use, re-use or redistribute it, subject at most to measures that preserve provenance and openness.

There are two dimensions of data openness:

  1. The data must be legally open, which means they must be placed in the public domain or under liberal terms of use with minimal restrictions.
  2. The data must be technically open, which means they must be published in electronic formats that are machine readable and preferably non-proprietary, so that anyone can access and use the data using common, freely available software tools. Data must also be publicly available and accessible on a public server, without password or firewall restrictions. To make Open Data easier to find, most organizations create and manage Open Data catalogs.
Dialects or regional variations
Is the text of the definition a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Source of definition online "Open Data Essentials," World Bank, accessed October 15, 2015, http://opendatatoolkit.worldbank.org/en/essentials.html (links omitted)
Significant terms and phrases re-use, provenance, openness, open, electronic format, machine readable, machine-readable, non-, proprietary, non-proprietary, software, data, accessible, server, firewall, catalog, public domain, terms of use, password, open data
Definition Data is open if anyone is free to access, use, modify, and share it — subject, at most, to measures that preserve provenance and openness.
Dialects or regional variations
Is the text of the definition a quotation or a paraphrase of the source? quotation
Source of definition online "Glossary of Public Sector Information and Open Data Terminology: All Terms," data.gov.uk, accessed June 25, 2016, https://data.gov.uk/glossary
Significant terms and phrases data, access, use, modify, share, provenance, openness, open, open data

Connections to this term or phrase[edit]

The following pages have some connection to "Open Data": Creating ecosystem maps for open data, International Open Data Conference - Day 1, International Open Data Conference - Day 2, Launching the U.S. Open Data Toolkit: Putting Government Data to Work, Open Data (English, noun), Open Data Intermediaries in Developing Countries, Seis recursos para analizar los avances e impacto de los datos abiertos, The Social Dynamics of Open Data, U.S. Open Data Toolkit, Virtuous cycle (English, noun), Viscous Open Data: The Roles of Intermediaries in an Open Data Ecosystem, What is ‘open data’ and why should we care?.

The following pages include "Open Data" as an antecedent term or phrase: .

The following pages include "Open Data" as a synonym: .

The following pages include "Open Data" as a translation equivalent: .

... more about "Open Data (English, noun)"
World Bank +  and United Nations +
open data +, government +, access +, accessible +, public +, data +, people +, company +, organization +, venture +, analyze +, pattern +, trend +, data-driven +, solve +, Open Data +, Big Data +, big data +, overlap +, mission +, free +, open +, transparent +, business +, corporate +, technology +, academia +, nonprofit +, license +, reuse +, openness +, content +, use +, modify +, share +, anyone +, purpose +, re-use +, provenance +, electronic format +, machine readable +, machine-readable +, non- +, proprietary +, non-proprietary +, software +, server +, firewall +, catalog +, public domain +, terms of use +, password +, information +, user +, developed country +, developing country +, initiative +  and citizen +
I use "Open Data" to include data from anyI use "Open Data" to include data from any source that's made available in an "open" form that anyone can access and that meets a few specific conditions. All Open Data must be licensed in a way that allows for it's reuse. It should be in a form that can be easily read by computers, although here there are gradations of "openness." And there's general agreement that Open Data should be free of charge or cost just a minimal amount.e of charge or cost just a minimal amount. +, The term “Open Data” has a very precise meThe term “Open Data” has a very precise meaning. Data or content is open if anyone is free to use, re-use or redistribute it, subject at most to measures that preserve provenance and openness.

There are two dimensions of data openness:

  1. The data must be legally open, which means they must be placed in the public domain or under liberal terms of use with minimal restrictions.
  2. The data must be technically open, which means they must be published in electronic formats that are machine readable and preferably non-proprietary, so that anyone can access and use the data using common, freely available software tools. Data must also be publicly available and accessible on a public server, without password or firewall restrictions. To make Open Data easier to find, most organizations create and manage Open Data catalogs.ions create and manage Open Data catalogs. +  and Data is open if anyone is free to access, use, modify, and share it — subject, at most, to measures that preserve provenance and openness. +
The concept of Open Data is very new. It oThe concept of Open Data is very new. It originated with the belief that the enormous amount of information routinely collected by government entities should be available to all citizens. In the late 2000s, governments and entities began to allow a greater number of users access to these resources. The first government policies on Open Data appeared in 2009. Today, more than 250 governments at national, subnational and city levels; almost 50 developed and developing countries; and entities such as the World Bank and United Nations have launched Open Data initiatives — and more are launched every year.atives — and more are launched every year. +
Gurin, Joel, Open Data Now: The Secret to Hot Startups, Smart Investing, Savvy Marketing, and Fast Innovation (New York: McGraw-Hill Education, 2014), 9 (italics and irrelevant text omitted) +  and Gurin, Joel, Open Data Now: The Secret to Hot Startups, Smart Investing, Savvy Marketing, and Fast Innovation (New York: McGraw-Hill Education, 2014), 10 +
"Open Data in 60 Seconds," World Bank, accessed October 20, 2015, http://opendatatoolkit.worldbank.org/en/open-data-in-60-seconds.html +, "Open Definition," Open Knowledge Foundation, accessed August 11, 2015, http://opendefinition.org +, "Open Data Essentials," World Bank, accessed October 15, 2015, http://opendatatoolkit.worldbank.org/en/essentials.html (links omitted) +  and "Glossary of Public Sector Information and Open Data Terminology: All Terms," data.gov.uk, accessed June 25, 2016, https://data.gov.uk/glossary +